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Cadbury shares vision for carbon trading to

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The Ethical Sourcing Advisor at Cadbury, Tony Lass, has revealed how Cadbury is exploring innovative ways of encouraging Ghanaian farmers to adopt practices that will provide long-term sustainability in cocoa production for future generations of farmers. 
The initiative is a key objective of the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership, launched in 2008, which involves the investment of £45 million in supporting thriving cocoa communities in Ghana, India, South East Asia and the Caribbean over a ten-year period. 
Cadbury’s holistic approach to supporting Ghana’s cocoa farmers includes their ground-breaking move to Fairtrade certification for Cadbury Dairy Milk, which hit the helves in the UK and Ireland in July 2009 and which-when it rolls out to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Japan-will by 2010, quadruple the amount of fair-trade cocoa coming out of Ghana. 
This new initiative on sustainable farming practices follows key findings from a research programme conducted in eastern Ghana by Earthwatch which revealed that although in the short-term unshaded farms are more productive, traditional shaded farming is a more sustainable long-term solution which will deliver greater benefits for Ghanaian farmers. 
The challenge is to encourage farmers to increase their tree canopy and decrease their yield in the short term in order to increase productivity in the long term; the next stage of Cadbury’s programme is to use its resources and the skills of its on-the-ground partner organizations to help achieve this. 
Cadbury will also investigate how payments for ecosystem services and carbon trading could work as an incentive to farmers to return to shade growing. 
So far, in Ghana, the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership is focusing on working with 100 communities to draw up Community Action Plans to identify their development needs such as the construction of new schools buildings or forming Cocoa Youth Clubs to encourage the next generation to remain with agriculture, particularly, cocoa farming. 
It is also working to engage Extension Officers to deliver agricultural training programmes to farmers and ultimately train local farmers to take on the aforementioned role in their communities. 
The company is again focusing on its Ghana Wells Project which has, to date, built 911 wells in Ghana-with 46 wells commissioned this year. 
James Boateng, Managing Director, Cadbury Ghana said “Cadbury has a 100 year heritage in Ghana, and we want to be able to grow cocoa in Ghana for another 100 years. 
To achieve this, the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership (CCP) is working with key stakeholders to ensure that cocoa is farmed in a sustainable way. 
Source: Ghanaian Chronicle

The Ethical Sourcing Advisor at Cadbury, Tony Lass, has revealed how Cadbury is exploring innovative ways of encouraging Ghanaian farmers to adopt practices that will provide long-term sustainability in cocoa production for future generations of farmers.

The initiative is a key objective of the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership, launched in 2008, which involves the investment of £45 million in supporting thriving cocoa communities in Ghana, India, South East Asia and the Caribbean over a ten-year period. 

Cadbury’s holistic approach to supporting Ghana’s cocoa farmers includes their ground-breaking move to Fairtrade certification for Cadbury Dairy Milk, which hit the helves in the UK and Ireland in July 2009 and which-when it rolls out to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Japan-will by 2010, quadruple the amount of fair-trade cocoa coming out of Ghana. 

This new initiative on sustainable farming practices follows key findings from a research programme conducted in eastern Ghana by Earthwatch which revealed that although in the short-term unshaded farms are more productive, traditional shaded farming is a more sustainable long-term solution which will deliver greater benefits for Ghanaian farmers. 

The challenge is to encourage farmers to increase their tree canopy and decrease their yield in the short term in order to increase productivity in the long term; the next stage of Cadbury’s programme is to use its resources and the skills of its on-the-ground partner organizations to help achieve this. 

Cadbury will also investigate how payments for ecosystem services and carbon trading could work as an incentive to farmers to return to shade growing. 

So far, in Ghana, the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership is focusing on working with 100 communities to draw up Community Action Plans to identify their development needs such as the construction of new schools buildings or forming Cocoa Youth Clubs to encourage the next generation to remain with agriculture, particularly, cocoa farming. 

It is also working to engage Extension Officers to deliver agricultural training programmes to farmers and ultimately train local farmers to take on the aforementioned role in their communities. 

The company is again focusing on its Ghana Wells Project which has, to date, built 911 wells in Ghana-with 46 wells commissioned this year. 

James Boateng, Managing Director, Cadbury Ghana said “Cadbury has a 100 year heritage in Ghana, and we want to be able to grow cocoa in Ghana for another 100 years. 

To achieve this, the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership (CCP) is working with key stakeholders to ensure that cocoa is farmed in a sustainable way. 

Source: Ghanaian Chronicle

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