Home > International News > How a 73-year-old widower lost $300,000 to a scam in Ghana

How a 73-year-old widower lost $300,000 to a scam in Ghana

 

Paul

Paul

 Three years ago Paul lost his loving wife Nancy.

Broken-hearted and looking for friends he joined a website that linked seniors with likeminded people.

The 73-year-old from Emerald made many friendships with women all over the world and they would talk about the opera, ballet and culture.

But it was a relationship that started with a woman named Selena in Ghana that was Paul’s undoing.

“I originally believed everything she said,” said Paul.

“Then she had a car accident and asked if I could send $1200 for the operation … and then she needed money for medication afterwards.”

After about 12 months Paul flew over to Ghana to meet Selena and was introduced to a young chief who wished to get him involved in a ‘profitable’ gold mining project.

Spotting a chance to help a small village racked with poverty and poor living standards, Paul became involved in supplying machinery, but it was a scam that has left him more than $300,000 out of pocket.

Paul is one of a growing number of people being lured into these scams by mainly Nigerian crooks who also operate out of Ghana.

He was on the Gold Coast yesterday to discuss his experience at the National Advance Fee Fraud Symposium at the Crowne Plaza.

Steve Otitoju from Nigeria’s Economic Financial Crimes Commission — which fights fraud in the African nation — said Australians were particularly susceptible to romance scams.

“They trust too much and too easily,” he said.

“You must cross-check facts, you must check out sources before you give out money.”

Mr Otitoju said all Nigerians had suffered because of the reputation fraudsters had given his country.

“It has tarnished the reputation of Nigeria and Nigerians,” he said. 

“Nigerians are being targeted by Nigerian fraudsters as well and and when they are in other countries in particular it can be hard for them to get help because people look at them and think ‘you’re Nigerian, you must be a fraudster’.”

Credit:ghanabusinessnews.com

Source: Gold CoastThree years ago Paul lost his loving wife Nancy.
Broken-hearted and looking for friends he joined a website that linked seniors with likeminded people.
The 73-year-old from Emerald made many friendships with women all over the world and they would talk about the opera, ballet and culture.
But it was a relationship that started with a woman named Selena in Ghana that was Paul’s undoing.
“I originally believed everything she said,” said Paul.
“Then she had a car accident and asked if I could send $1200 for the operation … and then she needed money for medication afterwards.”
After about 12 months Paul flew over to Ghana to meet Selena and was introduced to a young chief who wished to get him involved in a ‘profitable’ gold mining project.
Spotting a chance to help a small village racked with poverty and poor living standards, Paul became involved in supplying machinery, but it was a scam that has left him more than $300,000 out of pocket.
Paul is one of a growing number of people being lured into these scams by mainly Nigerian crooks who also operate out of Ghana.
He was on the Gold Coast yesterday to discuss his experience at the National Advance Fee Fraud Symposium at the Crowne Plaza.
Steve Otitoju from Nigeria’s Economic Financial Crimes Commission — which fights fraud in the African nation — said Australians were particularly susceptible to romance scams.
“They trust too much and too easily,” he said.
“You must cross-check facts, you must check out sources before you give out money.”
Mr Otitoju said all Nigerians had suffered because of the reputation fraudsters had given his country.
“It has tarnished the reputation of Nigeria and Nigerians,” he said. 
“Nigerians are being targeted by Nigerian fraudsters as well and and when they are in other countries in particular it can be hard for them to get help because people look at them and think ‘you’re Nigerian, you must be a fraudster’.”
Three years ago Paul lost his loving wife Nancy.
Broken-hearted and looking for friends he joined a website that linked seniors with likeminded people.
The 73-year-old from Emerald made many friendships with women all over the world and they would talk about the opera, ballet and culture.
But it was a relationship that started with a woman named Selena in Ghana that was Paul’s undoing.
“I originally believed everything she said,” said Paul.
“Then she had a car accident and asked if I could send $1200 for the operation … and then she needed money for medication afterwards.”
After about 12 months Paul flew over to Ghana to meet Selena and was introduced to a young chief who wished to get him involved in a ‘profitable’ gold mining project.
Spotting a chance to help a small village racked with poverty and poor living standards, Paul became involved in supplying machinery, but it was a scam that has left him more than $300,000 out of pocket.
Paul is one of a growing number of people being lured into these scams by mainly Nigerian crooks who also operate out of Ghana.
He was on the Gold Coast yesterday to discuss his experience at the National Advance Fee Fraud Symposium at the Crowne Plaza.
Steve Otitoju from Nigeria’s Economic Financial Crimes Commission — which fights fraud in the African nation — said Australians were particularly susceptible to romance scams.
“They trust too much and too easily,” he said.
“You must cross-check facts, you must check out sources before you give out money.”
Mr Otitoju said all Nigerians had suffered because of the reputation fraudsters had given his country.
“It has tarnished the reputation of Nigeria and Nigerians,” he said. 
“Nigerians are being targeted by Nigerian fraudsters as well and and when they are in other countries in particular it can be hard for them to get help because people look at them and think ‘you’re Nigerian, you must be a fraudster’.”
Source: Gold Three years ago Paul lost his loving wife Nancy.
Broken-hearted and looking for friends he joined a website that linked seniors with likeminded people.
The 73-year-old from Emerald made many friendships with women all over the world and they would talk about the opera, ballet and culture.
But it was a relationship that started with a woman named Selena in Ghana that was Paul’s undoing.
“I originally believed everything she said,” said Paul.
“Then she had a car accident and asked if I could send $1200 for the operation … and then she needed money for medication afterwards.”
After about 12 months Paul flew over to Ghana to meet Selena and was introduced to a young chief who wished to get him involved in a ‘profitable’ gold mining project.
Spotting a chance to help a small village racked with poverty and poor living standards, Paul became involved in supplying machinery, but it was a scam that has left him more than $300,000 out of pocket.
Paul is one of a growing number of people being lured into these scams by mainly Nigerian crooks who also operate out of Ghana.
He was on the Gold Coast yesterday to discuss his experience at the National Advance Fee Fraud Symposium at the Crowne Plaza.
Steve Otitoju from Nigeria’s Economic Financial Crimes Commission — which fights fraud in the African nation — said Australians were particularly susceptible to romance scams.
“They trust too much and too easily,” he said.
“You must cross-check facts, you must check out sources before you give out money.”
Mr Otitoju said all Nigerians had suffered because of the reputation fraudsters had given his country.
“It has tarnished the reputation of Nigeria and Nigerians,” he said. 
“Nigerians are being targeted by Nigerian fraudsters as well and and when they are in other countries in particular it can be hard for them to get help because people look at them and think ‘you’re Nigerian, you must be a fraudster’.”
Source: Gold Coast
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